Word of the Day: en masse – The New York Times


Advertisement
Supported by
Word of the day
This term has appeared in 188 articles on NYTimes.com in the past year. Can you use it in a sentence?
Send any friend a story
As a subscriber, you have 10 gift articles to give each month. Anyone can read what you share.

: all together or as a whole
The term en masse has appeared in 188 articles on NYTimes.com in the past year, including on March 4 in “How Scarves Became a Staple in Soccer Culture” by Alexis Benveniste:
Colorful scarves are prominent in soccer culture, especially in Europe. They most likely began appearing in the soccer world in the early 1930s, Peter Holme, a curator at the National Football Museum in Manchester, England, told The Times. But it wasn’t until the 1970s that scarf-wearing became a widespread feature at games, Guy Oliver, FIFA’s football historian, said.
… Photographs show that soccer scarves were first worn in Britain in the interwar period, Mr. Oliver said, but fans have always been eager to identify with their favorite teams. The main impetus for wearing scarves en masse “would appear to be the shift in popular culture that happened in the 1960s,” Mr. Oliver added.
Can you correctly use the term en masse in a sentence?
Based on the definition and example provided, write a sentence using today’s Word of the Day and share it as a comment on this article. It is most important that your sentence makes sense and demonstrates that you understand the word’s definition, but we also encourage you to be creative and have fun.
Then, read some of the other sentences students have submitted and use the “Recommend” button to vote for two original sentences that stand out to you.
If you want a better idea of how en masse can be used in a sentence, read these usage examples on Vocabulary.com.
If you enjoy this daily challenge, try one of our monthly vocabulary challenges.
Students ages 13 and older in the United States and the United Kingdom, and 16 and older elsewhere, can comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff.
The Word of the Day is provided by Vocabulary.com. Learn more and see usage examples across a range of subjects in the Vocabulary.com Dictionary. See every Word of the Day in this column.
Advertisement

source


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.